Reminisce with Us on Tech-Free Summers as a Kid

Lost on coming up with tech-free summer activities for your child? We definitely were, so we enlisted some of the BulliPatrol team to reminisce about what they used to do over the summer before technology was as popular as it is today. You can read through our team’s Q&A to spark some ideas and get to know the people that are on a mission to stop the mean behind the screen!

allisonmook1.jpg

Allison Mook Founder and VP Client Services

1. What was your childhood equivalent of a cell phone? Were you ‘addicted’ to it?

I can easily say that board games were the equivalent to at least an iPad or other kind of digital entertainment. I’m not sure if “addicted” is the right word, but we would have Monopoly tournaments that would go on for days!  As a family, we would spend our evenings playing Boggle or Scrabble. My mom was an English Professor, so you can imagine how frustrating it was for all of us to play these word games with her.
 
 

 

2. When you think of long summer days as a kid, what memories strike you the most? Why are they so striking?                                                                                                                              

In the 4th grade, a new neighbor moved in and instantly became my best friend.  She was two years older than me, but we were so similar in personality and maturity level that you would never know there was an age difference. Every summer morning, we were perched in front of her TV, watching Ultraman!
It was produced in Japan and had really bad English voice-over editing, but we loved it no matter what. From there, we’d head down to the lake, fishing poles in one hand and a loaf of bread in the other. It didn’t matter if we caught anything, we just enjoyed knowing that we had the freedom to roam.
 
3. What did you do when you were bored? Were there times when you had to suffer boredom because there was so little to do?                                                                                                    

I honestly don’t remember ever being bored. If I got tired of swimming, I would go fishing. Once I was tired of fishing, I would go for a bike ride or walk to one of my friend’s houses to play. One summer, my neighbor’s mom and brother were in town for the summer, so they taught me how to Macrame. There was always something to do both inside and out.

Alanna+Headsot+Edited.jpg

Alanna Johns Creative Lead

1. What was your childhood equivalent of a cell phone? Were you ‘addicted’ to it?

The number one thing that I could not go anywhere without as a kid was a sketchbook. I have many sketchbooks that I filled out as a kid because I was addicted to drawing. I would spend hours on end just creating my own characters, stories and doodles. To this day, I’m still addicted to drawing but it just transferred from traditional paper and pencil to digital art using Adobe Illustrator and Sketchbook Pro.
 
2. When you think of long summer days as a kid, what memories strike you the most? Why are they so striking?

In my elementary school years, I lived near Pensacola, Florida. Summers were miserably hot and the beaches were filled with tourists. Luckily, my parents owned a piece of land next to our house full of shady, tall trees. My sister, a few of our neighbors, and I used to play in that little “forest” everyday, playing pretend dinosaurs and creating forts made out of branches. I remember my mom forcing us to wear long sleeves and jeans because we would always scratch ourselves climbing trees and get swarmed by mosquitos.
We also had a trampoline in the backyard and we used to make our own water park with a hose spraying over top of the net. My best friend at the time brought a bar of soap one day and we combined the two. A slippery, wet trampoline may not be the safest thing (although we still had a net so that we didn’t fall off) but it was definitely a LOT of fun.
These memories are so striking because of how different things are now with city life. There’s lots of buildings, maybe some trees, but nothing compared to what I had available as a kid.
 
3. What did you do when you were bored? Were there times when you had to suffer boredom because there was so very little to do?

If I ever got tired of drawing, I would always play with my younger sister. We are only a year apart so we were pretty inseparable. Sometimes, my mom would make me play with my sister if I said I was bored, and of course I groaned about it. In the end, I always forgot why I was complaining and had fun playing with barbies and games with my sister. I couldn’t imagine what being an only child would be like because without my sister, I think I’d be bored all the time.

Stephanie Torre Headshot.jpg

Stephanie Torre Content Lead

1. What was your childhood equivalent of a cell phone? Were you ‘addicted’ to it?

My childhood equivalent to a cell phone was AOL’s instant messaging feature which I would use to chat with all of my friends after school. I was definitely addicted to it, because it was the first thing I would look forward to doing when I came home from school each day which is kind of sad. I also remember posting away messages and people would take those messages so seriously, even if they were just song lyrics or something. This was the first platform I experienced cyberbullying on.

2. When you think of long summer days as a kid, what memories strike you the most? Why are they so striking?

When I was younger, the biggest summer event I would look forward to were long beach vacations on Sanibel Island with my family. We would spend our days boating, paddle boarding, swimming, tanning, barbecuing, and playing outdoor games. I loved being outdoors as a child and always enjoyed being in the warm sunshine and saltwater.

Fries-sq.png

Thea Fries Content Creator

1. What was your childhood equivalent of a cell phone? Were you ‘addicted’ to it?

As far as tech-free goes, I was in middle school during that obsession with those animal shaped jelly bracelets and the whole skater girl thing was big too, so I got a skateboard and would try (very poorly) to do tricks like my brothers.
 
2. When you think of long summer days as a kid, what memories strike you the most? Why are they so striking?

I have three brother and we all grew up three years apart from the youngest and oldest above us. Both of my parents worked and so during the summer they used us as a system of checks-and-balances on one another- I guess hoping that at least one of us would look after one other. We’d spend tons of time just lounging around and eventually we’d get so bored we would gather all of the pillows in the house and play a game where you could only move around the house if you were stepping on a pillow. From that, we’d develop strategies to figure out how to get 3-4 of us (and sometimes friends) across the house with the few pillows we found. It sounds kind of dull, but those are some of my favorite childhood memories!